Chapter 1

Reminiscing on past OPS (Operations)... 1970 – 1980

Support Group – RLI (Rhodesian Light Infantry)

We had been based at Darwin for a few days and just getting used to our new troop officers that came to us from the NS (National Service) intake 136 ... Jim, Dick and a few others boasted 20 years of university and not one degree amongst them ... Great bunch of guys...

At about 15:00 SB (Special Branch- Police) guys came to the OPS (Operations) room and were huddled with the OC (Officer Comanding) and Lt Jim ... About 18:00 we were called for a briefing ... The OP was a walk in to ambush a Gook leader who was known to be attending a beer drink at a kraal near Ruchinga ... We had an SB guy and informer to lead us in...

We left Darwin in the Bedfords just after last light and were dropped off supposedly 5km from the kraal ... The informer got lost and we were about ready to gut him when we heard the sounds of a good party ... We crept forward to outside a kraal in extended line and we were about 50m from the edge when we saw 2 figures with AK's slung walking towards us ... Jim upped and opened fire and being a good MAG gunner I had 4 belts joined, so, without pause I opened up and hosed off 4 belts without taking my finger off the trigger ... I can't remember who the other gunner was but we both went through 8 belts ... Jim shouted for us to stop and we sank down and watched for a few minutes but had to pull back a bit as we had started a bit of a bush fire that was a bit intense ... At first light we swept through the village and found 2 Gooks, one believe it or not still alive although well ventilated ... all his wounds sealed and cauterized by the bush fire ... The Gook, Herbet Chikwatwa or some such name was the main man for the Darwin area and SB had a short chat to him but with 25 7,62 holes in him he didn't really last long...

One of Support Groups last contacts before becoming a commando...

Morning startup

One of my memories is of Grand Reef. Early morning PT with the commando in three ranks standing at ease with everyone standing with their hands down the front of their shorts keeping the hands warm!!!!

The smell of breakfast cooking in the mess tent and as we start the call out siren goes – O well here we go again ... grab two slices of bread, slap an egg and bacon on and try to put on kit while running to the choppers as you could already hear the turbines winding up – Giggle at the chopper tech as he is doing his walk around trying to eat breakfast and watch the run up...

As you roll out the revetments open up the cammo cream tub and start on legs and the buy the time you have done the roll off your face is striped up...

Wafa Wafa – the war starts... (Wafa translated means dead – spoken like this can be taken as "if yo die you die – no problem)

A Hot affair

Fire Force Darwin in the early days was a scream a minute ... We were based next to the chopper pad with only bunkers and a shower block next to the chopper pad – I don't know who was supposed to keep the fire going in the "donkey" for hot water but generally after last light there was no more hot water – not a problem, a quite stroll to the chopper pad and relieve them of a bucket full of Avtur ... threw a can full on to the donkey fire and you have instant fire!!!! Until one night coming back from the club we decided that we wanted a lot of hot water – yes we did – on whole bucket on the fire which produced one hell of a fire consuming half the ablution block!!!!! The OC's voice bellowed out and like all good troopies no on was seen in 5 seconds flat ... Boss never did find out who singed his eye lashes.

Note – donkey here refers to a Rhodesia boiler made up out of 45 gal drums with a fire box underneath.

A Gunners Perspective

In the early days of fire force the MAG gunner sat in the left front to support the Tech (doubled as a door gunner with 2x30 Brownings) on his Browning ... One of my early call outs we were sent by K Kar (Comand Helicopter armed with a 20mm cannon) to circle an area a klick (kilometer) from the main contact site ... As the G Kar (Troop carrier) pulled up 2 gooks opened up at us so both the Tech and I replied with virtuous intensity (Tech was JB Britten).

Now comes the painful part of the story ... Sitting in the front you have to shoot left handed which is not that big a problem except when it comes to changing belts where muscle memory has to be re-learnt ... The biggest problem is the spent doppies (Catridge casings)– they shoot straight down – now remember one is firing from a sitting position, most troopies go commando – yes you guessed it – very hot NUTS ... The next biggest problem is Vellies (Bush shoes)– Nice and open at the top to receive hot doppies ... Now try to imagine what the tech was thinking as I was bouncing around shooting and trying to get hot doppies out of painfull places ... JB, the Tech, nearly wet himself and was no help at all – O and the Gooks lost 2 love...

Freedom Of The City

One of the most moving yet painful parades ever was the RLI freedom of the City of Salisbury. The most emotional moment of it all was when we wheeled into First Street and the RAR band struck up THE SAINTS ... The crowd lining First Street went ballistic and all one could faintly head was the drum cadence.

What no body thought about or even considered was that we marched for bloody hours with an FN in the left hand all the time with no relief ... OK if you were clever you hooked the cocking handle on to your stick belt ... When we halted at the drill hall and RSM shouted "ORDER ARMS" it sounded like a ship load of scrap metal hitting the tarmac ... I know it took me 15minutes to get my flaming fingers straight never mind working...

Darwin Memories

In the early days Darwin was the centre of the war effort – the road from Bindura was still dirt and was mined occasionally.

Darwin consisted of – Police Station, Club, a few stores and the army depot – On an open piece of ground near the club the Air Force established a chopper pad & next to that became the fire force base...

Darwin's residents supported the troops with an intensity that astounded us all ... Supported by various Ladies organizations from Salisbury they started the Troopy Canteen ... Just about any time of the day or night a large Hamburger, chips and salad was always available ... Entertainment was non stop – Clem Tholet, 4 Jacks & aJill, John Edmond are a few to mention...

The real heroes of the war effort were those Ladies that supported their sons and Friends...

Tracking – Wafa Wafa.

One of my best memories of Kariba is WAFA WAFA the wonderful tracking training camp at Kariba – the wonderful rustic Bashas (Stick & leaf shealter), no food, assault coarse, no food, rope course, no food and the esteemed training staff who were bushmen of note!!!!! Ant, John, Zengai and the rest of the instructors were brilliant and taught us well – Mind you they had their week spot when we swapped a 12ft Python for a T bone each – well they said we could eat what we caught and having never had noka (snake) before we were willing to try but they insisted we would like 500g T bones instead.

One of the highlights of the course was operation egg ... To the civies (Civilians) reading this, this is the culmination of your survival training. You are issued with one fresh egg, one rifle with one taped magazine, strip searched and allowed to wear shorts, T shirt and vellies. A belt and knife are also allowed ... Come last light you are all dropped off in the valley about 5km apart – the mission is to cook your egg before first light ... The main problem is that this is a National park area and the instructors send out a notice to all the inhabitants of the date of the exercise.

I was dropped off well after last light so while the RL (A 5 ton Truck) was driving away I used its lights to find the biggest tree in the area. First objective – FIRE ... Now rubbing sticks together don't work ... As Bear Grylis has shown on TV it's a mission even in daylight ... However having been in a farming family, necessity is the mother of invention!!! Did I mention a taped magazine – well not a problem, slide the bottom off and extract previously hidden matches etc... – start fire and already feeling good. Dig a hole and line with leaves, piss in it, cover with more leaves and soil, scrape fire over the top and one instant oven,,, Easy until you look up and in the fire light see a very large Lion licking his chopps (lips) ... Grab rifle and climb tree – easy – Noooo ... I didn't check the tree out and it's a bloody knob thorn!!!! O well torn and bloody I look down and I could swear those bloody cats were laughing at me – I gave up and just froze to that thorny branch for the rest of the night –

Collected in the morning my egg was cooked and the instructors walked around and laughed at me as the tracks were a bit obvious ... O well another life experience

"Shot in the foot"

Again

One of the best things about the School of Infantry in Gwelo was that it literally shut down on a Friday until Monday morning – If you could keep your nose clean and dodge duty it was easy to duck out at about 3 and hit the road to Bumba Zonke (Salisbury) for a very quick 3 hour drive...

I was using a BMW 2002 that I briefly owned and this thing could run. I had blasted though most dorps (Towns) until I got to Norton where there was a road block and I was stopped by some very irate Cops – I was told I was under arrest for blasting through Gatooma at 120mph and got clocked leaving Hartley at 130mph ... as quick as a flash I told the cop I was on an urgent call out hoping he would believe me and send me on my way – fat chance – sat me down and he hit the radio and they phoned camp – 5 minutes later he comes running back and tells me to follow the highway patrol BMW as there was a call out and I was to be escorted to the main gate – SHIIIIIT!!!! That one did not go down well. Mind you I did have fun as there was very little in the top end between a 2+2 or a 2800 – (Old BSAP drivers will know what its like)...

Moral of the story is don't lie – you just get in to worse kak(shit)– I had to track for 2 days and still be back on course on Monday – Snyed again...

SB & the Troopy

John Gordon Davis summed up an RLI troopy in "Hold my hand I am Dying" in that no one can strip a gook as fast of valuables as an RLI Troopy – However, we constantly snyed them ... In fact at one stage it was so embarrassing that I took a lot of the "stuff" over to my SB buddy who kept his trap shut. One particular contact we didn't fes (Own) up to we made out like Bandits – We had a good contact and we had at least an hour before SB and GC (Ground Coverage – Police) arrived so you can imagine that a good inspection was done – we had hit a paymaster and the area commander plus his retinue so the pickings were great – I was a bit worried so I put back a roll of money into the gooks back pocket and we then stood around – the SB guy was one of those pricks no one liked at all including his own staff. He floored me totally when he got me off to one side after clean up and slipped me a roll of money and said "you guys are really slipping up, you left some cash on this guy" Shit I was floored – I had already tossed all my graze (Food) out of my pack and had it stuffed with notes, the roll that was left was like pocket change. Like any good Sgt I shut up and we went back to base. (we were para (parachute)sticks so had to wait for the trucks to uplift us).

Anyway that money was put to some serious troop entertainment and purchase of some good luxury items... (New Datsun 1200) – You may ask how much – I am not telling but I will say I went over to Austria every January skiing for many years ... To be honest Mack (SB Boss) did ask me a few years later when I was working for him how much I had scored – I gave him the answer and he just shrugged his shoulders and said that he had always wondered where the money had got to!!! He never said another word ... O by the way – I was lucky enough to klap 4 paymasters in my time ... Kept me honest...

Recce schooling

Having done my Para course at Tempe I had met many SADF (South African Defence Force) guys and we became good friends. In fact RSM K was the one that helped me put my first folding stock together.

About a year after our meat bomb course we were based at a wonderful resort type bush airstrip called Mabalahoota ... Now this was a place that was definitely hidden from the AA guide – basically because there was stuff all there ... The Ellies (Elephant) in that part of the world were the most aggressive and dangerous to be found – they had been shot at, had feet blown off by AP mines and were really grumpy...

From this world renowned place we deployed into Mozambique and had great fun causing mayhem and despair for the poor Freds and Gooks ... Anyway back to the theme of the story – I don't know if you guys realize but the kit we wore in the RLI was mostly hand made – we had a brilliant Taylor and Cobbler back in camp that would make anything to spec – I think in fact that the first jacket webbing was designed and made by Taffy Liverick. We all had our own design of kit that was sewn together to suit personal preferences so that as a group going out on patrol we must have looked like a bunch of Hobo's. Because of the climate most of the guys wore shorts and T shirts with vellies. Some even lost the T shirt.

We were briefed on an upcoming OP (Operation) and the senior NCO's (Non Commissioned Officers) were taken to one side and told of the arrival of some guest troops to see how we did it ... Now this was going to be a scream a minute I could see it coming ... After lunch we heard a Dak (Dakota)approach and watched it land with interest as it was not one of ours. The doors opened and out stepped my old friend RSM K and Major XXX. The guys watching just about pissed themselves laughing as we were treated to one of the smartest parades of men ever seen. Shit these guys were immaculate ... I asked the RSM if they were just stopping off for lunch before going on to a main parade some where else – he gave me a dirty look and then burst out laughing at me when it dawned on him as to who I was ... To give you an idea, I was in shorts, T shirt, Sandals and cammo (Camouflage cream – also known as Black beauty cream) cream with a cut down folding stock FN in one hand ... We had a long meet and greet and I introduced the guys to our OC and we sat and chatted about their expectations. The poor SADF guys were gobsmacked with the food, dress and attitude of the camp – it was definitely a culture shock for them. The Captain I was allocated was shocked when he learnt that he had to wear shorts ... Please let me explain – I know a person moves one hell of a lot quieter through the bush in shorts as you can feel branches, grass & thorns etc. In Long combat fatigues I found most guys just blunder on – a good way to get compromised. Another thing was footwear – Footwear was what the local population wore ... that was bare foot or Namantalas – what's that you may ask – specially designed sandals constructed from old Dunlop SP49 tyres – the best sandals ever made ... The other option was to get your Vellies retreaded by the camp Tailor using Michelin!!!!

So the guys were happy with their education but went on to work with the SAS and found that was more to their liking as they could wear jump boots again...

Life goes on

Watching TV with friends the other day we were giggling at an old A team episode ... My buddy asked me if all units had a "Face" man – the unit scavenger – Yes we did ... I don't know about other units but we had 2 ... Chris Meyers and Kapie Warner ... What those two couldn't find was not worth talking about – Chris could come up with cold Beer and T Bones in the middle of the Low Veld ... KP procured gensets, weapons and bits and pieces that HQ had never thought about ... I think we had the only fully electrified bush camp in the Batalion until 1Cdo got jealous!!!!

Memories of Covert OPS & how to keep them that way...

We (Dog section) – Mortar Troop, Support commando, RLI, were posted to the border fence to relieve the National Service guys for 3 weeks. This was a welcome diversion from to much Fire Force so we were well pleased ... We took off and set up camp (Mukambura area) in the Main camp and promptly had the NS Captain on my arse as I used 20 bombs (81mm) to register my targets, and to have fun ... After a week of utter boredom, I had enough of lying in my pit reading books ... I was good mates with the SB and Support Unit guys and the SB oke told me to take a walk – which I did over the next 10 days ... I mapped 2 gook camps pretty well and had great fun...

One year later we did a large Commando external where we were to walk in 26kms into Porkers and assault a camp ... I got my memory stirred a bit but shut my mouth as the only person who knew of my wandering days in that area was my SB buddy ... I had never told my boss ... We started our big walk in at last light led by an SAS Cpl who I cant remember ... By 2 am I went to the boss and told him the Pathfinder was lost – no one beats the map reading skills of an RLI troopy carrying an 81mm barrel and 4 bombs!!!!! After a short explanation to the Boss and a klap on the back of my head from my Tp (Troop) Officer, I lead the team in and set everyone up to an empty camp ... Could have told them that as well!!!!!

Many an excursion was had and my successive bosses just asked my opinion and guidance, never gave official reports but drew some good maps ... The secret was exactly that – once you tell some one it is no longer a secret and it will bite you on the arse...

First Pay Parade – RLI

Having joined the army a few weeks before training course started we were allocated to a barrack room and called WASTERS ... Now for us this was brilliant as it allowed us to get our kit up to scratch and start learning how to skyve (hide from work) ... We were put under Boet Botha who was the nominal CQMS (Company Quatermaster) Clerk and he also ran the armoury – Now Boet was a character of note – Initial training was how to get a Lion (Beer) with your lunch at the Graze (Food) hall – where the troopy canteen was and how to dodge the CSM (Moose Erasamus). He also taught us how not to fall ass over tit on pay parade!!!! You had to march in to CSM's office, come to a halt, Salute the pay officer, recite number rank and name, sign for pay, about turn and march out ... Sounds simple doesn't it!!!!! Naaaaaa...

Firstly the Corridor and floors were High Gloss, High Polish all slip no grip ... So any gobby (recruit) marching into CSM's office with enthusiasm and coming to a halt found out that Newton's laws do apply in all aspects of life. I don't know how many guys I watched come to a halt and their feet just kept on sliding forward – O dear another recruit on his ass ... O well no pass this weekend and more polish on those bloody floors...

First Bush Trip

When I passed out of training troop I was allocated to Support group – they were in the bush already so I was told to get my kit together & I could go with the next days Ration run – This was great so I humped my kit on the Bedford RL the next morning and we made a fast trip to Darwin to join the Convoy to Mukas at 10am ... Our driver – Vawn Stockhill- Gill (RIP), was laid back and a hoot to ride with as there were only the 2 of us on the truck... (We left barracks at 3am) – This was my introduction to the old Bedford as a driver – Not being part of any convoy till Bindura the Speedo was pegged at the full stop near the 0 ... All the way round the clock – shit that thing could fly...

The cop van following us said we hit 80mph going down the long downhill past Mazoe – eish ... We joined the border convoy at Darwin and Vawn snuck in about ¾ the way back – 1st SAP, then the Goffels followed by NS etc ... Make sure to leave the cookies (Land Mines) to the SAP!!!! Just before Rusambo there is a long gentle curve around a valley and we could see the front of the convoy opposite us when all hell let loose. Vawn calmly pulled the RL off the road and we debussed into the ditch where upon Vawn hauls out his Gaz stove and starts making tea ... I am shitting myself as the crack of rounds over head was a little mind blowing – Vawn calmed me down and we sat listening to this war going on – An NS officer crawled up the ditch and asked Vawn what the hell was going on – Vawn calmly tells him to relax in that the SAP were just venting ... We found out later a TF (Teritorial force – like US Gard unit) at the rear of the convoy had an AD and the SAP returned fire – it took ages to calm down ... We only got down to Mukas late that night and CSM Pretorius was really pissed of as he had run out of Brandy the night before ... Mukas is another long story all of its own so I will leave it there...

Extras & Bob

Bob (Beech) & I had been busted in the bush for being a bit out of hand (again) I will not mention what for but we were both given 5 extras each by the RSM, mine to start the day we got back from the bush ... Now as many of you old Sgts know, duty Sgt and Duty Officer duties were recognized punishment positions and the base staff were delighted that they had a little relief ... My duty officer and partner in the aledged previous crime was my and Bobs good friend Lt Willar (Simon) ... The duty is not that bad, up at 5 & check the guardroom prisoners, up to the Troopy mess and check out the graze (Food) – O well that is where the day went downhill – many of the recruits in there doing NS were my old school friends, asking them if the graze was OK Niki hesitantly said it was a bit off ... I smelt it and promptly told all the guys to stop eating and taking the graze to the WO1 (Warent Officer) in charge I asked him if the graze was OK to eat – well he went into Orbit – just about killed his cooks, stood in the graze hall and told all the troops to stoop eating and phoned OC training troop that his guys would be late from breakfast – the guys all had fresh steak egg & chips ... Anyway I hadn't been feeling great from the start of the day so I scooted off to town and went into the Salisbury gen (General Hospital) to check on our guys there ... I was visiting with Albe Mare who had his leg stuffed up when I felt really weird and guess what – I collapsed and was out like a light – good place to do it as I was promptly dumped in ICU where I woke up 5 days later. I was transported back to camp hospital and who should I see doing morning rounds the next day – Bob Beech with a scowl on his dial (Face)– He proceeded to shit all over me as after I did my wheels up he had to take over my duties and then do his – shit he had a humour failure!!!! We had a good chuckle over that week as he visited and were still good mates to the end – O yes, what was wrong with me – they never found out – just some stupid bug that put my diff into tilt.

Christmas on Patrol

After taking and passing my Masters Degree in D& D (Ducking & Diving) – Instead of skiing in Insbruck, I was caught for an external patrol/OP session in Porkers. – Insertion was – you guessed it – all my sins klapped in one go – a bloody long walk in, anti tracking the whole way ... I will not repeat my comments at that time sufficient to say is that Mabalahoota had very, very, dark clouds over it.

After a 4 day walk in we established a relaxed base and a wonderful OP ... Frelemo/Gook soccer – I even sent the scores...

Day 6 of our stay we found a Moont that was so starved we thought he was dead – we set up a drip and slowly IV'ed penicillin and Vitamins. The second day we had him we nearly killed him with a dog biscuit he was so hungry – Anyway what a find – this guy hated the Freds and Gooks so bad it was amazing. They had killed his whole family and taken all his farm equipment etc ... not a happy bunny ... His int (Information) was so good that I was asked to stay in as long as I could ... O well Xmas dinner was a bit lean as we finished most of our graze the day before and resuply was only the next night. So a wonderful lunch of chopped ham and orange segments...

Our friendly moont turned out to be a coloured chap who was actually very well educated – he spoke English very well as well as Pora, French etc ... Plus Shangaan ... After a week on Muti (Medicine) the guy got well enough that we started eating like kings – nothing tastes better than a little piggy in clay...

In the end we spent 41/2 weeks watching Fred patrols, Gook training and various other activities ... The funniest thing to watch was when an aircraft came over – it looked like a Chinese fire drill ... The chappy we saved from hunger went back with us and on to do other things and we went to Burg and had fun...

Bush Base

Logistics and set up

I have been asked to describe a typical base bush camp set up and how we went about it – Strange as it may seam but it is now a totally lost art as I have experienced over the last few years building Tourist Lodges in out of the way places...

There are a few very important people that have to be there to make things happen in comfort or else your camp is a grind – The CQMS (Quartermaster) is the pivot of the camp – if he is not jacked up life is very KAK!!! – We were lucky to have Chris Meyers who in my opinion was one of the best. The second most important lad is the cook – old but true saying is that an army marches on its stomach.

Base camps were generally set up within a square with a pushed soil Burm around it around 4 – 5m high. Bunkers were dug in in the corners and sandbagged with sleepers and conveyor belting.

The CQ had 3 to 4 Merc 4,5's with canvas canopies. Two of the CQ trucks were parked 6-8m apart with a canvas between them creating the kitchen. A large gas burner and trestle tables completed the kitchen. Gas freezers were leveled and lit. The third Truck was the canteen – Generally packed high with coke and beer!!! And 2 freezers!!!

OPS room truck and kitchen were both set up first with all hands on deck – Next was toilets (long drop & desert lily) showers and chow area. Long Drops were dug and 4 poles and Hessian wrapped around. Desert Lilies were dug in various troop areas as allocated. Showers were set up – these were a 20l drums with taps welded to the bottom with a shower rose. The hot water was from a 210l drum lying on a frame with a spout out the top of one side and a funnel at the top of the opp side with a pipe extending to the bottom of the inside of the drum. Fire underneath and hot water on demand...

Troop (platoon) areas were then set up with tentage etc for all the guys. Generally this was left for last as most of the time the guys deployed as soon as the basic camp was set up. Many a time Chris was left to set up the whole camp with himself, 2 cooks, 2 signalers, 4 batmen, MT rep and a few of the sick lame and lazy.

Camp was simplified later on when we borrowed a gen set from the SAP permanently – Electric fridges don't need leveling and are not temperamental – those bloody gas fridges were worse than women with PMS!!!!

Well there is the basics – if we were at a forward fire force base then all the guys were available to set up so comfort levels were good – We were lucky in that we had a good bunch of batmen who looked after the guys kit. The individual troops carried their own tentage and where responsible for their own comfort. Being in Dog section we were lucky in that we had mostly Unimogs for carrying the 81mm tubes and ammo. Bob had Mogs and 106mm so generally we had twice the vehicles of most commandos.

The biggest and most important thing was comfort for the returning patrols – good food, hot showers and a dry and comfy place to gonk. (Sleep)

This is dedicated to my old friend Chris Meyers – Thanks for looking after us...

Tragedy

Not all bush memories are good so here is a heartbreaker ... We responded to a mission being attacked and we were to be deployed around it to start searching for spoor (Tracks) etc – On the approach to the Mission there was a concrete causeway across the river – Vawn Stockhill, as usual going a little fast, slid the RL off into the water – unfortunately he got his foot jammed between a rock and the fender of the RL with his head barely inches below the water – Fingers and Jonny boy worked like demons trying to breathe for him while the rest of us tried to move 5 tons of sandbagged RL – Unfortunately we failed as we couldn't even find a pipe to use as a snorkel – a very tragic ending to a guy who was a natural bushman – he could speak Shone and Matabele better than a local and was an exceptional tracker – RIP old friend...

New Helicopter Pilot (Alloette 3 – G Car)

I cant remember exactly who the Characters were but I am sure it was Al Thor&^ and Phill T&^. You will remember who you where!!!!

We had just had a Roll off Take off that was BAD ... We were really heavy and the Pilot was trying to get up to speed and lift but where the tarmac ended there was about a 6" drop to the dirt – There was a bad thump and bounce and it looked a though The Pilot was trying to pull the collective through the roof – Both the Tech and I on opposite doors nearly bailed out but the Pilot finally got it together and we managed to wobble off in to flight – A few minute later (I had a head set on) I heard the Tech ask the Pilot to please return to base – Yhe Pilot asked "Why" – the Tech calmly replied "Well we have all just shat ourselves and we want to go back and change" ... There was a long silence & then the Pilot piped up with a quiet – "Sorry"...

The Pilot did turn in to an exceptional pilot and was one of our better pilots we had and still flying to this day...

Bobs Long Walk

After successful seasons of Fire Force the powers at large decided to deliver unto the Gooks a little of their own medicine – LAND MINES!!!! So our wonderful and sadistic engineers lead by the wonderfully sadistic Charlie decided to cook up the ultimate cake tin – that was what it looked like, a large cake tin only it was made out of Fiberglass ... This was filled with higher grade boom mix and set off by a variety of very sneaky and sadistic little devices. The main feature were slots for 3 AP (Anti Personnel) mines on the top, underneath was a separate anti lift device. Separate to these were the provision for connecting a light sensor (make boom when uncovered) and a matt that when probed would close the circuit and you guessed it – BOOM ... Now these were wonderful in ways except one small little problem – they were bloody heavy!!!!

Now in a stick of 4 we could only carry 2 of these beasts but that was not a problem as we organized night air drops for the rest and planted around 2 per night...

The response and circus started around 2 days after we started ... The BOOOOM's were heard up and down the length of the area and the Gooks got really irate with Imperialistic White Smith Regime – the Gooks stopped traveling on the roads after day 3 and used tracks in the bush – this lasted another day until they found the tracks were also mined ... Giggle giggle ... On about day 5 we were watching their mine patrols clearing the roads and found that the Gooks had given up trying to defuse our mines and were just putting a grenade on top and running like hell ... As a matter of interest here any good tracker can pick up (see) a mine in no time at all ... OK Huston we had a problem – actually no – just more fun – think of the opportunity to take out whole Gook patrols – yes the good ones are with me – lay a dummy mine, Cordex back 50meters connected to 4 claymores –

Damn we had fun, we found out that Bobo their esteemed leader had to walk through virgin bush to get back to Maputo and his European and American sponsors ... Ag shame, poor Oke...

To all international readers – Bob Mugabe has proved himself to be the highest rated perpetrator of Genocide in world history – He has also managed to Bankrupt a wonderful country and sell it to the Chinese...

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